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BestNest.com Newsletter
May 4, 2004

The BestNest.com Newsletter offers fascinating content on backyard wildlife and garden decor products as well as information about upcoming specials, additional online content, and new product offerings.

IN THIS ISSUE:
  • New At The Nest
  • Mother's Day Gifts!
  • Current Clearance Items
  • Bird Profile: Orioles
  • The BestNest.com Giveaway Winner is ...
  • Free Merchandise to be Awarded Every Issue

New At The Nest
We have recently added over 100 new items in an effort to offer you the best backyard wildlife and garden decor products. Here are just a few of the many exciting products found in our Just Added category


more info


Happy Bird Deluxe Wild Bird Solar Sipper
HAB-10008
Now: $22.95



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Heartwood Copper-Top Butterfly House & Pole, Grey
HW-019A
Reg: $63.95
Now: $54.95



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Heartwood New Chick Chickadee House, White Birch
HW-075D
Reg: $45.95
Now: $39.95



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Heartwood Wren Inn, Redwood
HW-077C
Reg: $45.95
Now: $39.95



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Mark Feldstein Hummingbird Rain Gauge
MFA-4484HB
Now: $14.95



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Mark Feldstein Galileo Thermometer, 17"
MFA-6817
Now: $24.95



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Mark Feldstein Original Singing Bird Clock, Green, 13"
MFA-DLB-023GR
Now: $19.95



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Mark Feldstein Mother Nature's Monitor w/Receiver
MFA-MO20
Now: $39.95



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Parasol Mini-Blossom Chandelier, Blue, 12 oz.
PAR-CHB
Now: $69.95


Mother's Day Gifts!
It's not too late to find a great Mother's Day gift! Not only do we have a fantastic selection of products Mom will love, we also have a variety of shipping options to have the gift delivered on time. Here are just a few of our perennial favorites.



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Connecticut Retreat Birdhouse
CN-20054
Reg: $99.99
Sale: $94.95



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The Love Nest Birdhouse
CN-20646
Now: $24.99




FREE USA
STD SHIPPING
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Droll Yankees Yankee Flipper Squirrel Proof Bird Feeder
DY-YF
Reg: $110.99
Sale: $89.95




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Red / Green Spotted Flower Hummingbird Feeder, 16 oz
HA-J30901
Now: $29.95




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Heartwood Cape Cod Wren House, Smoke Grey
HW-039A
Reg: $45.95
Now: $39.95




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Opus Garden Ballet Hummingbird Feeder Mobile, 30 oz
OP-26004
Reg: $39.99
Sale: $34.95




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Opus Looking Glass Hummingbird Feeder, 32 oz
OP-8110
Now: $24.99




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Parasol Bouquet-3 Hummingbird Feeder, Antique Rose, 10.5 oz
PAR-BQ3AR
Now: $44.95




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Dew Drop Hummingbird Feeder, Multicolor Red/Orange, 21.5 oz
PAR-DDMR
Now: $34.95


Current Clearance Items
Here are a few items recently added to our Clearance section. Stock may be limited, so hurry before they are no longer available!

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Aspects Hummingbird Gift Pack
ASP-260
Reg: $29.95
Sale: $24.95



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Birding Company Deck Railing Bird Feeder
BCO-78140
Reg: $65.95
Sale: $49.95



more info


Heartwood Wood Shed Bird Feeder
HW-002
Reg: $47.95
Sale: $29.95



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Heartwood Wround Wren, Yellow
HW-031B
Reg: $55.95
Sale: $39.95



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Heartwood Flutterbye Cottage
HW-045
Reg: $189.95
Sale: $129.95



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Heartwood Large Bird Bistro Feeder, White w/ Verdigris Roof
HW-051C
Reg: $499.95
Sale: $249.95


Bird Profile: Orioles
Each month in 2004, BestNest will be featuring a species profile for the birds about which we receive the most comments and questions. We hope these profiles are both educational and entertaining, so please let us know if there is anything we can do to improve them. Enjoy!

May 2004: Orioles

Orioles are quickly becoming one of the most popular birds to feed and attract. Though many of us are only familiar with the prevalent Baltimore oriole, there are 10 species of Orioles that can be found in North America. What makes orioles so special? Let's take a look:

Worldwide, there are 24 species of orioles. All of them are found in either North or South America. 10 of those species are found in the United States. All 48 contiguous states have at least one species of oriole that returns to that area each spring; many states have several. The five most prevalent North American species, the Baltimore, Orchard, Bullock's, Scott's, and Hooded orioles, are all migratory. Their return from South America spans March 15 through May 15:

March 15: Southern Arizona, New Mexico, Texas
April 1: Southern California, Southern Arizona, Southern New Mexico, Southern Texas, Southern Louisiana, Southern Mississippi, Southern Alabama, Florida
April 15: Northern California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, Southern Colorado, Northern Texas, Oklahoma, Southern Kansas, Northern Louisiana, Southern Missouri, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, Southern Tennessee, Southern North Carolina
May 1: Oregon, Northern Nevada, Southern Idaho, Wyoming, Northern Colorado, Southern South Dakota, Nebraska, Northern Kansas, Iowa, Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, Northern Tennessee, Northern North Carolina, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Virginia, Delaware, New Jersey
May 15: Washington, Northern Idaho, Montana, Southern North Dakota, Northern South Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, Southern Maine.
After May 15: Southern Canada, Northern North Dakota, Northern Minnesota, Northern Maine

There are always exceptions to these dates; however, this is an excellent guide to when you can expect to see orioles in you area.

Orioles are actually part of the Blackbird family, which includes blackbirds, cowbirds, grackles, and meadowlarks. All North American orioles have a variation of black and orange or yellow plumage. Males tend to be more brightly colored, with deep orange and black feathers, while females tend to be a darkish yellow or orange with less black and more gray or brown. All North American species build hanging or semi-hanging nests, which often require the right type of branches for stability. They will not use man-made housing. Most orioles prefer deciduous trees (trees that lose their leaves during the winter months) to conifers (evergreen trees and shrubs); however, you will find them using confirms in the northwestern areas of their nesting range. Because their nests "hang", they require different nesting materials than other birds. Many people will put out string, yarn, cloth strips, etc. for orioles to use. Besides the longer fibers needed to suspend the nest, softer, more "downy" materials are used to line it. Oriole nests are quite resilient, and will often last through the winter even after the orioles have left for their migration.

Unlike other birds found in the backyard, Orioles have a diet that doesn't include seed. They primarily eat insects, fruit, and nectar. One of the benefits of attracting orioles is that they consume many different types of pest insects, including moth and tent caterpillars, grasshoppers, beetles, gypsy moths, and ants. They are also known to eat bees and spiders. Unfortunately, the use of pesticides to curb the spread of those pests can be very dangerous to orioles. If you are fortunate enough to attract orioles, do not use pesticides and allow the orioles and other birds (such as bluebirds) to naturally reduce the pest populations. You may also consider using mealworms to attract orioles. Mealworms are more often used for attracting bluebirds, but the orioles also use them to feed their young. In addition to insects, orioles love fruit and nectar. They are particularly fond of oranges, but will also eat apples, grapefruit, raisins, cherries, and cactus fruits. They are also very fond of grape jelly. Nectar is another important part of their diet. Oriole nectar is the same as what you would use in hummingbird feeders; however, many people make a less "rich" mixture by using 5 parts water to 1 part sugar rather than the 4 to 1 ratio used for hummingbirds. Oriole feeders do differ from hummingbird feeders. Primarily, they are orange in color and have bigger perches to accommodate the larger bodies of the orioles. They also have larger ports that allow for the larger oriole beak size. Many feeders have built-in features that allow orange slices, halves, or jelly to be placed on the feeder. There are also fruit and jelly feeders available that are suitable for attracting birds other than orioles. Like hummingbirds feeders, oriole feeders need to be cleaned and have the nectar, jelly, or fruit replaced on a regular basis.

If you are in need of a new oriole feeder, there are several different oriole feeders available at www.bestnest.com. We offer nectar mix and several informative books, such as the Stokes' Oriole Book. If you would like more personal assistance, please email us at customerservice@bestnest.com or call 877-369-5446.


more info


Aspects Oriole Feeder, 16 oz
ASP-361
Now: $19.95



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Droll Yankees Fruit Feeder
DY-FF
Now: $6.99



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Nature's Way Live Mealworms - 2,000 count
NAW-LM-02K
Now: $19.95



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Opus Saucer Oriole Feeder, 16 oz
OP-467
Now: $15.99



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Rubicon Deluxe Fruit & Jelly Bird Feeder, Green & Driftwood
RUB-DFR100HD
Now: $27.95



more info


Stokes Oriole Book
STK-ORB
Now: $12.95


The BestNest.com Giveaway Winner is George Kreider!
CONGRATULATIONS to George Kreider who just won a new Opus Expeditions Copper Hummingbird Feeder! To claim your prize, please send an email to customerservice@bestnest.com and include your address information and telephone number. We may follow-up with a phone call to verify your address information and identity. Congratulations!

Next issue, our winner will receive a new:
Opus Saucer Oriole Feeder, 16 oz
Now: $15.99

Free Merchandise to be Awarded Every Issue
As a subscriber to the BestNest.com Newsletter, you will be automatically entered into our drawing for free BestNest.com merchandise. Every issue, we will announce a new winner in our newsletter. The winner will be announced by First and Last name and must claim the prize within 30 days of notification. For more information about our giveaway, please visit http://www.bestnest.com/bestnest/bnmail.asp .

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